Fun Things to Do While Camping in Winter

Fun Things to Do While Camping in Winter

Most people go camping in the summer, but you shouldn’t let a little snow keep you away from exploring the wilderness! Winter camping can be just as rewarding—and it offers unique opportunities to enjoy yourself if you know how to take advantage of them.

We’ve put together a list of ways to make the most of your next winter camping trip, based on our experiences in the great outdoors. Find out what to bring and how to plan your days for an absolutely unforgettable cold-weather camping experience.

Fun Things to Bring on Your Next Winter Camping Trip

There are plenty of things you can do on a winter camping trip without much equipment, and we’ll cover those shortly. For now, though, consider investing in some of the gear below to make your winter camping trip dynamic and exciting.

Sink Your Teeth Into Ice Climbing

Frozen waterfalls don’t just look beautiful—they can also provide plenty of thrills for those of you daring (and skilled) enough to climb them. Be warned, though: you’ll want to buy climbing equipment if you don’t have it already, and we don’t recommend this activity for the inexperienced. Don’t worry, though; we’ve got plenty of less-intimidating activities coming up!

Cook Campfire Comfort Food In a Dutch Oven

Warm meals taste even better in cold weather, and you can make a whole range of delicious dinners and desserts when you buy a Dutch oven for your winter camping trip. Check out this list by Fresh Off the Grid to find some recipe inspiration.

Sleep in the Snow with a Winter Sleeping Bag

Sleeping in the tent is all well and good, but getting some shuteye with the winter sky directly overhead and waking up to a fresh layer of undisturbed snow can be deeply invigorating. Choose a sleeping bag that offers appropriate seasonal protection, then turn yourself into a human burrito.

Take a Walk Through the Wild with Snowshoes

Snowshoeing can be a surprisingly effective exercise as well as a wonderful way to enjoy walking through a winter wonderland. Find snowshoes for men, women, and kids so that every member of your family can enjoy this fun and easy winter camping activity.

Up Your Dessert Game with an Outdoor S’more Maker

S’mores taste even better on chilly winter nights, but you’ll want to spend less time making them and more time eating them in cooler temperatures. Use an outdoor s’more maker to streamline the process so you can enjoy these high-calorie camping delicacies faster and s’more easily.

coking smores on the campfire

Fun Things to Do on Your Winter Camping Trip

Don’t worry; you don’t need to break the bank on new gear to have a great time camping in Winter. The following activities require minimal investment, but offer maximum enjoyment.

Scour the Snow for Animal Tracks

There’s still plenty of wildlife around in winter, but you’re more likely to see animal tracks than animals themselves. Learning to recognize the different prints left by rabbits, raccoons, and other furry creatures can provide hours of entertainment on a cold-weather walk—just make sure not to disturb any habitats you find!

Build an Igloo

This skill is both fun and practical to learn if you camp in winter often. These snow fortresses offer surprisingly effective protection from the elements when done right, and are much easier to construct than you might think once you learn how to build them.

Visit a Hot Spring

There’s no such thing as a bad time to soak in a natural hot spring. That said, we especially love the contrast between warm hot-spring water on our bodies and cold winter air on our faces—so if you’re able to camp near a hot-spring this winter, we thoroughly recommend the experience!

Build a Snowperson

Little kids will love this one—but honestly, who doesn’t love this classic winter pastime? All you need is a carrot, some buttons, and maybe an old hat or scarf to give your creation a little personality of their own.

Have a Snowball Fight

We couldn’t resist putting this at the end of our list. After all, it’s practically impossible to see fresh snow and not want to throw it at your friends or family members—and where can you find fresher snow than in the wild? Grab a few handfuls and turn it into your own personal arsenal (just make sure to stay safe and check your snow for sticks and rocks before you start throwing!).

Snowshoeing in the winter

Make Winter Your Favourite Camping Season

Camping in the winter might be cold, but it also comes with the chance to have fun in ways other seasons don’t offer. Try our tips above to get the most out of your next winter camping trip, and please reach out to us if you have winter camping ideas of your own to share!

 

Check Out These Campgrounds You Can Book Through The Winter

Fun Things to Do While Camping in the Summer

Fun Things to Do While Camping in the Summer

Plamondon Whitesands Resort

Summer may be in the rear-view mirror this year, but if you’re anything like us then you’re already planning next year’s first summer camping trip. That gives you plenty of time to organize the gear and supplies you’ll need before you head into the wilderness again, so you’ll definitely be able to stock up on some new items over the next few months. You’ll also want to brainstorm some new activities for your next warm-weather camping excursion, and our team is here to help. Below, you’ll find our list of fun things to do and essential equipment to bring on your next summer camping adventure.

Fun Things to Bring on Your Summer Camping Trip

Some activities can be performed without specific tools or toys—but not these. Don’t worry; we’ll get to the activities that don’t require any special gear later. But first, consider bringing some of these things along next time you go camping in summer.

Sleep in the Shade with a Hammock

One of the nicest things about camping in warm weather is the ability to sleep comfortably outside. Buy a hammock and hang it up between two trees to create a perfect place for catching some Zs without soaking up too many UV rays in the process. Hammocks also make ideal places to read, or just lounge in nice weather with a drink in hand!

Enjoy a Warm Wash with a Solar Shower

You don’t have to sacrifice all the comforts of home when you go camping. Solar showers use the sun’s rays to heat up water for your daily wash, providing you with a luxurious soak even when you’re “roughing it”. Let those bright summer days help keep you clean in style!

Have a Tubular Time with an Inflatable Kayak

Mountain rivers and lakes are at their most inviting during the year’s warmest months, and a watercraft you can inflate is much easier to pack than one you need to mount on top of a vehicle. When you buy an inflatable kayak, you’ll also save yourself the pain of portaging it to and from the water—although we strongly recommend pairing it with a bike pump or portable air compressor so you won’t have to blow it up with your mouth.

Kayaking on a lake while camping in the summer

Use a Solar Fire Starter to Cook with the Power of the Summer Sun

When you’re camping in the darker portions of the year, you won’t always have the sun handy as a source of energy—but the summer offers many opportunities to make sunshine work for you. Case in point: this solar fire starter, which can save you money on fuel and make you feel like a rugged explorer whenever you’re getting ready to roast marshmallows.

Make a Margarita with a Hand-crank Blender

Thanks to some innovative party animal, crushed ice is no longer a luxury you can only find in the city. And what better way to enjoy a perfect summer day in the wilderness than by kicking back (maybe in that hammock from earlier) with a refreshing margarita or two (or three)? This hand-crank blender will provide you with all the crushed ice you need—no electrical outlet required.

Fun Things to Do on Your Summer Camping Trip

Of course, there are lots of ways to have fun on a summer camping adventure that don’t involve buying fancy new gear, and they’re equally worth your time. Try some of these activities that require little more than good weather and the right attitude:

Check Out the Night Sky by Stargazing

Summer nights often offer clear skies, so make the most of them! Staying up late and counting constellations is an excellent way to experience all the magic this season has to offer (for best results, bring along a star chart so you can tell what you’re looking at).

looking at the clear stars in the night while camping away from the city.

Turn the Lake Into a Playground with Water Balloon Dodgeball

This one’s great fun for kids and adults (c’mon, who doesn’t love a good water balloon fight?). Just make sure you’re using environmentally-friendly water balloons and cleaning up after yourself—it’s always best to leave nature as good or better than you found it.

Light Up Your Night with a Beach Bonfire

If you’re camping near a beach, building a bonfire can set the stage for an unforgettable evening. Just make sure that you’re following the law; most provinces have strict regulations about when and where bonfires can be held. Find out if you’ll need permits, secure them ahead of time, then pack your sticks and marshmallows!

Stay Active with a Game of Frisbee Golf

All you need for this simple and fun game is a frisbee, some open space, and nice enough weather to play in. The concept is pretty similar to regular golf: you set up “holes” using markers, then see how many throws it takes before you can get the frisbee to them!

Keep the Bugs Away with Natural Bug Bombs

Summer camping offers the nicest weather and the most daylight, but it can also come with plenty of pests. Instead of spraying insect repellent every few minutes and slapping yourself silly, have fun keeping unwanted critters away by taking some time to make bug bombs from sage, lavender, and other plants growing near your campsite! You can find an easy and effective recipe here.

Fill Your Next Summer Camping Trip with Fun

The clear skies, balmy temperatures, and long days of summer make it easy to enjoy your experience in the great outdoors. Use the suggestions above for inspiration, and feel free to contact us with any other summer camping ideas you want to share!

 

Popular Summer Campgrounds

 

14 Camping Ideas Perfect For Summer

14 Camping Ideas Perfect For Summer

Camping can be a blast, but it’s best when you plan ahead. Make sure your agenda includes plenty of activities, be sure to bring the right gear, and don’t forget to take along some tasty recipes to enjoy at your campsite!

Need some inspiration before you venture into the great outdoors? No problem. We’ve put together a list of 14 summer camping ideas that are guaranteed to help you have an absolutely wild time. And don’t forget to book your campsite online with CampReservations.ca!

Our Top 14 Summer Camping Ideas

#1: Try Letterboxing

This quirky hobby can turn your camping trip into an exciting scavenger hunt. Letterboxes are containers with logbooks inside that people hide in public places (like campgrounds) with clues to their whereabouts. Once you discover a letterbox, you can mark it with a stamp to prove you’ve been there. For a list of known letterboxes in Canada, click here.

#2: Make Omelettes in a Bag

One of our favourite breakfast recipes, the omelette in a bag is both easy and delicious—plus, it requires next to no cleanup! If you prep the ingredients before your trip, all you’ll need to do on the day is boil water. Here’s the recipe, and check out these other easy camping meals.

#3: Make S’mores!

If you’re camping with your children, s’mores make a tasty campfire treat guaranteed to help them enjoy their time away from civilization. Of course, you don’t have to be a kid to enjoy these classic campfire snacks! Learn how to make ‘em here.

#4: Bring Dryer Sheets

You won’t be doing laundry out in the woods, but dryer sheets have other uses. Use them to freshen up musty spaces (like the inside of an old tent or backpack) and place them under your tablecloth to keep bees away from your food! Just remember to dispose of them properly—nature is no place for littering.

#5: Use Your Belt to Hang Cookware

That’s right—you can save valuable table space by mounting s-hooks on your belt and wrapping it around a tree to create a makeshift set of kitchen hooks! Don’t believe us? See for yourself.

#6: Start Campfires Easily with Trick Candles

You know those candles you can buy at joke shops that relight themselves when someone blows them out? Bring a pack of those on your next camping trip, and you’ll find it a whole lot easier to start a campfire in windy weather.

#7: Save Money On a Sleeping Pad

You might not have a high-quality sleeping pad kicking around the house, but there’s a good chance you have a yoga mat—and that can work almost as well when you put it under your sleeping bag. Yoga mats also tend to be cheaper than good sleeping pads if you need to buy a new one.

#8: Make Coffee Sachets

You probably aren’t taking your coffee maker camping, but you don’t need to. Instead, just add a few spoonfuls of your favourite ground coffee to a filter and seal it with a string to create coffee bags you can steep in hot water, just like tea!

#9: Have Your Water Pull Double Duty

Clean out some empty plastic jugs and use them to freeze your drinking water before your trip. Then, keep them in your cooler to preserve perishable foods and thaw them out as needed when you need a nice cold drink.

#10: Make Campfire Hash

This versatile recipe makes a great addition to dinner, but can also be jazzed up to make a standalone breakfast or lunch! The whole thing can be prepped and cooked in under an hour, making it as convenient as it is delicious.

#11: Create Instant Lanterns For Your Campsite

Having a flashlight is great, but sometimes you want to see where you’re going in the dark while keeping your hands free. Just wrap a headlamp around one of your empty plastic jugs and tie it to a tree. Let there be light.

#12: Make Onion Bombs

We had to include at least one eccentric camping recipe on this list, and here it is! Onion bombs are just as odd and exciting as their name implies. They’re basically meat packed inside an onion, then foil-wrapped and baked over a campfire. Truly an explosion of flavour.

#13: Build a Handwashing Station

Roughing it doesn’t mean you have to forego basic hygiene. Stay healthy and keep your hands clean by using an empty laundry detergent container as a handwashing station. You can even add a roll of paper towels on top, like this person did.

#14: Use Corn Chips as Easy Kindling

Not sure you’ll be able to scrounge up enough sticks to start your campfire? In a pinch, you can actually burn corn chips like Doritos or Fritos. The grease in these products will burn easily, and can help you get a fire started when all else fails. Just don’t use them for the whole fire, since grease fires create a lot of smoke.

Put A New Spin On Summer Camping

With these new activities, campsite tips, and recipes to try, you’re about ready for your next adventure! Use what you’ve learned to get creative this summer and make this upcoming trip a truly memorable experience.

How to Beat the Heat While Camping This Summer

How to Beat the Heat While Camping This Summer

Warm weather is finally on the way, and you probably can’t wait to get out to the mountains for that summer camping trip you’ve been planning. However, planning for the weather is important when camping in any season, and summer is no different. You might not have sub-zero temperatures to contend with this time around, but how can you stay cool if the weather turns too hot?

We love to camp in all conditions, so we’re here to help you plan a no-sweat summer camping trip. With our advice, you’ll be able to chill out and stay cool no matter how drastically things heat up.

9 Quick Tricks to Cool Off On Your Next Summer Camping Trip

1. Bring a Hammock

We don’t necessarily suggest replacing your tent with a hammock—after all, you’ll be left out in the cold (literally) if the temperature suddenly drops overnight. However, bringing a hammock in addition to your tent can give you a cool and comfy way to rest on hot summer nights when the tent just feels too confined.

2. Remove Your Tent’s Rain Fly

You’ll want to check the weather report for your area before you do this—but if no rain is in the forecast, consider removing the rain fly from the top of your tent. The fly normally traps rising body heat while you sleep to keep it inside the tent, so taking it off lets this heat escape and keeps you cool as a cucumber (if cucumbers went camping).

3. Set Up Your Tent in the Shade

Tents can absorb a lot of heat from direct sunlight, turning your sleeping space into a veritable sauna as soon as the sun comes up. Avoid accidentally cooking yourself by setting up your tent in a shady space. Just remember, the sun changes position in the sky throughout the day—so either find a big patch of shade, or try to predict where the shade will be when you’ll most likely be using your tent and set it up accordingly.

4. Take Your Tent Down During the Day

This might require a bit of extra work on your part, but it’s an excellent way to prevent your tent from soaking up sunlight and storing heat all day. If you’re camping in a particularly warm area, it’s best to store your tent in a cool place throughout the day and set it up fresh each night before you go to sleep.

5. Bring a Battery-Powered Fan

This one’s pretty self-explanatory, but we’re putting it on the list anyway because—well, it’s just a good idea! Few things can cool you off on a hot day as quickly as a refreshing breeze, and when the weather won’t provide one, why not use a device that can make it for you?

6. Drink Plenty of Water

Hydration is essential for regulating body temperature in hot weather, and can also improve your athletic performance. If you’re planning any warm-weather activities during your trip, make sure you have lots of fresh, potable water on hand. We recommend investing in an insulated water bottle that can keep your water cool, too—after all, room-temperature water can kind of make it feel like you’re just drinking sweat, and that’s… gross.

7. Wear Light-Coloured Clothing

You might not remember this from elementary school science classes, but light colours reflect heat from the sun while dark colours absorb it. That means you’re going to be much cooler camping in white garments than black ones (even if black is mysterious and slimming). Maybe leave your band t-shirts and little black dresses at home, no matter how much fun you think it might be to wear them in the woods.

8. Go Soak Your Head (Before Sleeping)

Immersing yourself in cold water is an easy way to lower your internal body temperature before going to bed, which means it will take longer for you to heat up during sleep. Additionally, a soak in cold water may improve your circulation and promote deeper sleep, so consider pitching your tent next to a lake or river if you can find one in your area.

9. Relax Under a Moist Towel

Laying a damp cloth or towel across the back of your neck allows it to suck heat out of your body, cooling you off in the process. If you don’t have a towel (for some reason), you can pull this same trick by wetting your hat—or even your t-shirt!

Make Summer Camping Cool Again

Summer is the most popular camping season for many good reasons—the warm weather encourages plants and animals to thrive, opens up areas that aren’t accessible throughout the rest of the year, and lets you run around without needing to wear a bunch of heavy layers all the time. Just make sure you don’t overheat, and use the suggestions above to find relief from the heat when you need it!

The Ultimate Guide to Weathering Spring Camping… Weather

The Ultimate Guide to Weathering Spring Camping… Weather

Spring camping offers incredible experiences—the fresh scent of new flowers blooming, more baby animals to admire (at a safe distance), and way fewer insects to worry about than your typical summer trip. However, spring camping isn’t always guaranteed to be a walk in the park, so you’ll still need to pack and prepare for your trip responsibly.

Below, we’ll cover the environmental conditions you should expect to face when camping in the spring and how to be ready for them. We’ll also include details about the best gear to take on a spring camping trip (and a few tips for setting up your campsite). Read on—adventure awaits!

Spring Camping Weather: What Should You Expect?

It’s tempting to pack for warm conditions when planning a spring camping excursion—after all, spring is when the snow starts melting, right? While that may be true in a general sense, it’s vital to remember that inclement weather still occurs in spring and pack accordingly.

Furthermore, spring is the least predictable season in Canada when it comes to weather, offering much more variety than the others. Our winters are typically harsh, our summers tend to be short and relatively hot, and even autumn is easier to prepare for since people tend to anticipate the gradual onset of cold conditions once summer ends.

What you don’t want to do is anticipate summer conditions while packing for a spring camping trip—or you can easily find yourself at the mercy of unexpected wind, rain, snow, and hail. All it takes is one look at Trip Advisor to find horror stories of underprepared spring campers who were forced to find motels when things got too cold and wet for their light clothing and thin sleeping bags.

See also: 12 Ways to Stay Warm While Camping.

Hot (But Not Too Hot) Weather Tips for Spring Campers

  • The days might be getting warmer, but the nights can still get cold. Stay cozy by packing warm layers and a suitable sleeping bag (more on this later).
  • Many mountain lakes will likely still be frozen until late April, so don’t plan on canoeing. However, you also shouldn’t plan on walking across the ice because it will be in the process of thawing and more likely to break.
  • Canadian springs have more rain, wind, and temperature fluctuations than any other season (unless you happen to be camping in BC’s Lower Mainland during the winter, in which case we’ll just assume freezing rain is something you enjoy). You might be tempted to leave behind your windbreaker, raingear, or waterproof bags, but don’t.

What to Pack for Successful Spring Camping

While we’re on the subject, let’s talk about what to take if you want to make the most of your spring camping experience. The following is a list of items we consider essential for staying safe and comfortable throughout the season:

  • A 3-season sleeping bag is designed to keep the average person warm in temperatures ranging from -15°C to -1°C. Don’t just look for this rating, though—you’ll want to consider other factors as well, including the bag’s fit, features, and insulation type.

Also, make sure to check the forecast for the area where you’ll be camping ahead of time so you can tell whether a 3-season sleeping bag will actually offer enough warmth. Certain regions can drop below -15°C even in the springtime, and it’s best to use a bag rated for a few degrees colder than the conditions in which you plan to sleep. If you’re camping in elevated or remote northern regions, you’ll probably want something warmer.

  • Tents have similar ratings to sleeping bags. A 3-season tent will likely be adequate for spring camping in most regions, but it never hurts to take a 4-season tent just in case. For best results, take the 4-season tent as a backup (you should have a backup tent anyway, just in case the one you’re using becomes damaged during your trip).
  • Appropriate layers are a must for springtime campers since the weather can be so mercurial. Pack moisture-wicking base layers with long sleeves and pant legs, an insulated hoodie or jacket for your mid-layer, and an outer shell that provides high resistance to both wind and rain. If you’re going somewhere colder, put an insulation layer made of down or synthetic material between the mid-layer and the shell as well.

Springtime Campsite Setup Tips

Finally, here are a few key considerations for setting up your campsite during a springtime trip to the woods or mountains:

  • Bring a pad to go between your sleeping bag and the tent floor. The ground is still thawing during springtime, so it will be colder and harder than it would be during the summer.
  • Take along a tarp to shield your tent from rain and provide a covered space for activities such as cooking. It can be hard enough to start a fire outdoors without rain falling on top of it.
  • Consider bringing a portable propane or electric range as a backup cooking solution.
  • Be extra careful when disposing of leftover food and garbage. Baby animals are more likely to be out and about in spring than any other season—and while they can be adorable, you probably don’t want them (or their parents) digging through your campsite for scraps while you sleep.

Master Your Next Spring Camping Trip

Spring can be fantastic for camping—as long as you prepare accordingly. Use what you’ve learned above to pack the right gear, plan for appropriate activities, and optimize your campsite so that you can enjoy all that nature has to offer on your camping trip this season.

Essential Winter Camping Gear

Essential Winter Camping Gear

Those who truly love camping love it year-round. Weathering the winter winds can be just as rewarding as sleeping under the summer stars. Of course, the keyword there is “weathering” — so if you’re going camping in the cold, make sure you pack the proper equipment!

The following items will help you stay prepared for the elements on your next winter camping adventure. Read on to discover what you’ll need, and how it will keep you and your party protected.

See also:

What Makes Winter Camping Different?

Camping in the winter will be colder than going during other seasons — but that’s not all that makes it different. In addition to planning for extreme temperatures, you’ll also need gear built for environmental conditions such as ice and snow. Winter campers in backcountry regions will also need protection from howling winds, freezing rain, and avalanches — you know, all the fun stuff!

Finally, make sure you carefully study the area you plan to camp in before leaving home. That’s common sense for campers at any time of year, but in winter, it’s especially crucial since emergency help will likely be harder to reach and will take longer to arrive if you need it.

The Winter Camping Gear You Can’t Go Without

This gear can be useful on any camping trip — in fact, we don’t even recommend that you go camping in the summer without it. However, winter camping trips usually require specific versions of the items listed below, or additional knowledge on using them. Read carefully, so that you’ll know the difference between a sleeping bag that will save your life and one that will just turn you into a frozen burrito for bears.

Warm Clothes

Layers are the law when it comes to camping — but in winter, you’ll need to choose them extra carefully. Just throwing a sweater and some wool socks over generic long underwear won’t necessarily be enough to stop a chill from seeping in through the fabric. We recommend the following three-layered approach:

  • An inner layer of thermal underwear made from moisture-wicking merino wool or synthetics
  • A mid-layer made from either flannel or fleece
  • A top layer that offers strong protection against wind and moisture (such as a ski jacket with a GORE-TEX membrane)

As a general rule of thumb, winter campers should avoid clothing made from cotton. Cotton fabrics can absorb as much as 27 times their weight in water, and don’t hold body heat nearly as well as synthetic or merino wool products.

Extra Food

As we’ve mentioned in other posts, high-calorie food is your friend when you go camping in the wintertime. The more energy you consume, the more heat your body can produce while burning it, making fat- and protein-rich foods ideal. Stock up on bacon, pre-cook a pot of chilli, and pack a few frozen beef burritos — you’ll need to eat roughly double your regular daily caloric intake to keep your energy up. Yum!

Clean Water

What, did you think you could just melt snow to make water? Well, you can — but only if you have a way to purify that water before you drink it. Bringing water purification tablets and a portable stove will allow you to top up your supply if you’re camping in a snowy region. That said, it’s still a good idea to fill your canteens and hot water bottles before embarking.

Shelter

Pay special attention to your tent and sleeping bag while packing for a winter campout. It’s vital to take a tent that is rated appropriately for the conditions you expect to face.

We strongly recommend taking a 4-season tent, as they are made from stiff materials and generally designed to be more compact. These qualities make them sturdier in high winds, less likely to collapse under snowfall, and better at insulating heat.

Mummy bags are generally better for cold-weather camping than standard rectangular sleeping bags. The extra room in a rectangular bag may seem more comfortable at first, but your body will have to produce more heat to warm the excess air between you and the bag as you sleep. Mummy bags are much more snug, meaning you’ll lose less heat at night.

Finally, make sure to carry an emergency shelter on your person to use if you get separated from your campsite and can’t find your way back. Tarps and spare blankets can serve this purpose in the spring or summer, but it’s a safer bet to carry a bivy sack in winter.

Firestarter

You always need a way to start a fire when you’re camping, but winter campers can’t always rely on finding firewood at their campsite. Snowy tinder will most likely be too wet to burn, so you’ll need to bring your supply or pack an artificial heat source. Portable stoves will also help you melt snow into water, as mentioned above.

A Knife

There’s no such thing as a knife just for winter, but you’ll want any utility knife you bring on a winter camping trip to satisfy a few criteria. Firstly, you might want to bring a knife with a brightly-coloured handle so that it won’t get lost if you drop it in the snow. Secondly, consider bringing a knife with a padded grip so that you’ll be able to use it comfortably in the cold.

First-Aid Supplies

Winter first-aid kits should come with a few items not found amongst typical medical supplies. Most of these are for preventing hypothermia by raising a person’s body temperature. You’ll want:

  • Hand warmers
  • A mylar blanket
  • Waterproof matches
  • An instruction manual for dealing with hypothermia and frostbite

Finally, make sure you take along a safety whistle and a pack of flares. You’ll need them if you become separated from your party or need to be found by a search and rescue team.

Navigation Tools

Don’t count on electronic navigation tools when you’re camping in sub-zero temperatures. Battery-powered devices are notoriously unpredictable in the cold, so take a map and compass along — and make sure you know how to read both of them. Pace counting beads can also help you determine how far away you are from your campsite if a blizzard obscures your tracks or covers up landmarks.

A Headlamp

Flashlights are great for lighting your way in the dark, but they’re not as good for helping you work in dim conditions — since you need an entire hand just to hold them. Lanterns are a great alternative when you can rest them on solid ground, but they’re more likely to sink or tip over when you put them in snow.

Headlamps provide reliable and controllable illumination while leaving your hands free. Just remember to take an external battery pack if you’re camping in the cold since these devices can be just as susceptible to battery problems as an electronic GPS.

Sun Protection

We know — now that summer’s over, you’ve already stowed away the sunscreen. Well, you’d better dig it out of the closet and pack it into your winter camping supplies, because the sun still shines in the wintertime.

What’s more, snow and ice can reflect up to 80% of the sun’s UV rays into your eyes and skin from unexpected angles, causing damage and obscuring your vision during potentially dangerous activities. Besides sunscreen, always bring a pair of polarized sunglasses on a retainer leash, plus a sun-hat and SPF-rated lip balm.

With Winter Camping Gear, Details Make the Difference

While you might enjoy camping in any season, not all of your gear will serve you year-round. Learning how to augment your regular loadout will ensure that you stay protected from bad weather and ready for action — even in the harshest environments.